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#GivingTuesday Celebrates Those Who Do Good
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Are you ready to "Do More in 24"?

MAF airplane in when it lands in Sefoidi, a village in Papua, Indonesia
Boys greet the MAF airplane in when it lands in Sefoidi, a village in Papua, Indonesia. Photo by Mark Hewes.

NAMPA, Idaho — On Tuesday, December 2, non-profits around the U.S. are joining the #GivingTuesday movement and challenging individuals, families, churches, and businesses to give and give back.

"Black Friday and Cyber Monday place such a huge emphasis on buying and materialism,” said John Boyd, president and CEO of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF). “GivingTuesday is a way to turn our thoughts toward helping others."

#GivingTuesday was launched in 2012 as a more compassionate alternative to the hectic post-Thanksgiving shopping days. The #GivingTuesday website explains: "We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give."

Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has answered this call. The Nampa-based ministry organization is challenging area residents to do more in 24 by supporting MAF’s work in the isolated parts of the world. MAF operates a fleet of small aircraft that reach remote corners of Africa, Asia, Indonesia, and Latin America. The organization transports doctors, missionaries, relief workers, the sick and injured, and others, helping those who are otherwise cut off from the outside world.

"Last year, MAF conducted more than 27,000 flights in some of the most difficult parts of the world,” said Boyd. “MAF uses aviation and technology to share the Gospel and make life better for isolated people."

On #GivingTuesday, MAF hopes to raise $24,000 in 24 hours … to do more in 24. To learn more about #GivingTuesday and how a gift to MAF can change lives, visit www.maf.org/gt.

 

MAF Couple Honored for 50 Years of Marriage and 43 Years of Missionary Service
Thursday, September 25, 2014

Nampa Mayor Proclaims Friday, Sept. 26 to be John and Cora Lou Miller Day

John and Cora Lou on their wedding day
The Millers and their two sons in Irian Jaya
The Millers with Nampa Mayor Bob Henry
Top: John and Cora Lou on their wedding day. Center: The Millers and their two sons in Irian Jaya. Bottom: The Millers with Nampa Mayor Bob Henry.

NAMPA, Idaho — In a special ceremony Wednesday at Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) headquarters, Nampa Mayor Bob Henry proclaimed Friday, September 26, 2014, to be “John and Cora Lou Miller Day.”

Friday is the Millers’ 50th wedding anniversary. The proclamation also honors the couple’s 43 years as missionaries with MAF, a global missionary organization that uses airplanes and technology to support Christian and humanitarian work in remote parts of the world. John currently runs MAF’s machine shop and supervises volunteers.

The Millers met as students at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, where John was training to be a missionary pilot and Cora Lou studied piano performance. The couple married in 1964 and joined MAF in 1971. They served in Papua, Indonesia (then known as Irian Jaya), for 26 years. In 1997 they returned to the U.S. to work at MAF headquarters.

“John and Cora Lou have dedicated their lives to sharing the Gospel,” said Gene Jordan, MAF’s vice president of human resources. “As a missionary pilot, John flew helicopters and airplanes, including float planes. He landed on short, rugged airstrips created and maintained by the local villagers. John also repaired and maintained the airplanes. In addition to raising two rambunctious boys, Cora Lou served as flight coordinator, bookkeeper for the base, hostess for visitors, cook for conferences, pianist for worship services, and hair dresser.”

Though quiet and unassuming, the Millers are pioneers who lived in remote areas near people groups known for cannibalism and violence. Their life together is an adventure story that includes surviving a helicopter crash in the jungle, safely landing an airplane in the mountains after engine failure, and experiencing true miracles brought about through prayer.

But beyond that, “John lives out what a husband should be, “ said Jordan. “That is the true measure of a man.”

The mayor’s proclamation stated, “John boldly proposed marriage to Cora Lou at Fairplains Cemetery in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Cora Lou accepted his proposal in spite of the lack of a romantic presentation.”

Cora Lou laughed as she explained the situation. “We had already talked about getting married, but John didn’t want to give me the ring until he had my father’s approval. My father was concerned that John and I might argue a lot, as I have a temper and he thought John might too, since he’s a redhead. But Mother had seen John’s calm spirit, and since we had both been called to mission work, they gave their permission. After that stressful situation, John and I went for a walk in the nearby cemetery. It was beautiful, like a big park, and John gave me the ring.”

“They have a weird marriage,” said Pastor Keith Waggoner of Grace Bible Church in Nampa, where the Millers worship. “The dictionary says that weird means ‘something or someone touched by the supernatural.’ Their lives have undoubtedly been touched by the presence of God Almighty.”

Fighting Ebola with Airplanes
Thursday, September 11, 2014

Mission Aviation Fellowship Joins Battle Against Ebola in Congo

KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo — Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is supporting efforts to combat a deadly Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), MAF officials said today.

The Christian mission organization is using its airplanes to transport medical personnel and supplies into the remote Boende district of the DRC. According to the DRC Minister of Health, 59 cases of Ebola have been confirmed in the area, including 32 deaths.

“In the past week and a half, MAF has conducted several flights to the Boende area in support of the Ebola efforts,” said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. “There are no paved roads from Kinshasa to the outbreak site, but MAF is able to use Boende’s small airstrip to deliver medical personnel as well as quarantine equipment, personal protective kits, medication and syringes. We have also carried specimens out to Kinshasa for testing.”

MAF has nine aircraft in four areas of the DRC—in Kinshasa, Lubumbashi, Bunia, and Nyankunde. From these bases they fly to remote regions of the vast country, using small, rugged airstrips to serve isolated communities. In the DRC MAF supports the work of some 170 churches, medical organization, relief agencies, and others seeking to make life better for those who live in the DRC’s jungles.

Last year MAF conducted 1,151 medical-related flights in the DRC, including emergency medical evacuations and delivery of vaccines and medicines.

This is not the first time that MAF has responded to Ebola threats.

“In the 2007 and 1995 outbreaks in the DRC, our planes and people played a key role,” said Boyd. “We are experienced in such situations and have a plan in place to minimize the risk.” MAF’s Ebola Pandemic Management Plan contains procedures for safely carrying people, materials, and specimens to and from Ebola hot zones.

MAF Receives Grant for Internship Program
Wednesday, June 25, 2014

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has received a $66,800 grant from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust to fund an internship program at the organization’s Nampa headquarters.

MAF is a unique Christian ministry that uses airplanes, technology, and training to reach the world’s most isolated people. With a fleet of 52 light aircraft, MAF provides services to some 600 churches, relief groups, medical personnel, development agencies and others, allowing them to work in remote and difficult parts of the globe.

“We are grateful to the Murdock Charitable Trust for this exciting gift,” said Barbara Bowman, MAF’s vice president for ministry advancement. “The grant is allowing MAF to provide paid internships and mentoring to college students interested in the nonprofit sector. This gives them a chance to explore career options while developing valuable skills.”

MAF has already hired two student interns from Northwest Nazarene University (NNU), and is currently recruiting for a maintenance specialist intern who desires experience in aircraft maintenance. A job description and application form are available on the MAF website at www.maf.org/serve/usa. Qualified students are encouraged to apply by July 2, 2014.

MAF Audio-visual Intern Tyler Doohgan
MAF audio-visual intern Tyler Doohgan.

Tyler Dooghan is excited about his audio-visual internship. Dooghan graduated from NNU last month, and has been editing videos and shooting footage for MAF.

“I’ve been learning a lot more about the technical side of things and developing some much-needed skills,” said Dooghan. “This is a real career booster for me, whether I end up with a job at MAF or somewhere else.”

Based in Nampa, MAF is part of the global family of mission aviation organizations comprised of MAF Canada, MAF International, and several affiliate organizations in Latin America. Recent MAF work includes assisting with vaccination campaigns in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, supporting relief efforts in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan, and enabling the work of churches, evangelists, and Bible translators across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The organization employs some 180 staff in the Treasure Valley.

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust seeks to enrich the quality of life in the Pacific Northwest by providing grants and enrichment programs to non-profit organizations that seek to strengthen the region's educational, spiritual, and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. The trust is based in Vancouver, Wash. Learn more at www.murdock-trust.org.

MAF Family Safe, Home Destroyed in Sentani Fire
Monday, June 16, 2014

SENTANI, Indonesia - The Richards family is safe following a fire in Sentani, Papua, Indonesia on Friday, June 13, that destroyed their house and the adjacent Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) guesthouse duplex.

The blaze began when the Richards’ generator caught fire. The house was constructed primarily of wood so the fire grew in intensity quite quickly. Attempts to contain the fire were in vain, but it was a valiant effort by MAF staff, the mission community, and the local community as well. Praise the Lord no one was hurt during the event, which lasted for several hours.

The Richards had just a few minutes to grab some possessions before the smoke became too thick inside the house. They recovered very little besides the clothes on their backs and some appliances. Despite efforts to slow the blaze the fire spread to the C&MA guesthouse and burned it to the ground as well, though most of the furniture within that structure was removed prior to it burning.

Again we see the body of Christ working together in so many ways, from those helping to put out the blaze, to those surrounding the Richards in prayer and being there by their side.  

Please be in prayer for the Richards as well as the C&MA team.

A fund has been established to help the Richards family get back on their feet. To make a gift, click here.

MAF Announces Staff Changes at Nampa Headquarters
Monday, June 09, 2014

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) announces several leadership changes at its headquarters in Nampa.

Dave Fyock, VP of OperationsDavid Fyock is MAF’s new vice president of operations, and will oversee MAF ministry work around the globe. Fyock has been with MAF since 1992. He served for 13 years in various positions overseas before relocating in 2005 to MAF headquarters where he held the role of chief financial officer and vice president of resources, then served as executive vice president for six years before being named to the operations role. Fyock resides in Nampa.

Rick Dickson, Director of FinanceRick Dickson has been named director of finance at MAF. Dickson has served many roles with MAF around the world. He was the organization’s southern Africa area manager, overseeing MAF operations in the countries of Lesotho, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe. He also spent six years as director of MAF’s Latin America region. In 2011 Dickson moved to Meridian to assume the role of senior director of field operations at MAF headquarters, a job he held until accepting the finance position. Dickson spent more than a decade in the defense industry prior to joining MAF.

Doug Harrison, Director of TechnologyDoug Harrison of Meridian has been named director of technology. Harrison spent many years leading information technology operations in both the private and public sectors before joining MAF in 2004. He most recently served as manager of member care at MAF, providing spiritual and counseling support for the organization’s staff around the globe. He previously held a management position with MAF in Asia. In his new role, Harrison will be responsible for the ministry’s worldwide IT and learning technology functions.

Doug Haley, Director of Advancement ServicesDoug Haley is MAF’s new director of advancement services, with responsibility for the organization’s gift processing and reporting functions, as well as donor services. Haley comes to MAF from the Seattle area, where he most recently served as firm administrator for a law office. He previously worked in fundraising for two different faith-based nonprofits. Haley lives in Nampa.

MAF is a Christian ministry organization that enables the work of hundreds of churches, medical organizations, and relief agencies across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. MAF-US operates a fleet of 52 aircraft and has some 600 staff worldwide, with 180 in the Treasure Valley.

Mission Aviation Fellowship Releases Software for Creating Educational Materials
Wednesday, May 14, 2014

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has released Lumin, a free software program that makes it easy to create digital curriculum, presentations, eBooks, exams and more.

Using Lumin“According to some estimates, 85 percent of the world’s churches are led by people who don’t have any theological or ministry training,” said Elliot Dawson of MAF, who was instrumental in the development of Lumin. “They don’t have access to libraries or Christian educational materials, but they may have a digital device of some sort. Lumin was developed as a resource for these isolated believers. It’s an easy way to create learning materials that can be shared across a wide variety of devices and operating systems, without the need for specialized software.”

Lumin allows churches, teachers, pastors and trainers to produce and deliver educational resources, even in areas where access to the Internet is limited. Materials created in Lumin can be exported and viewed in most modern web browsers or exported directly into Estante, MAF’s digital library app, for storage and sharing.

“You don’t need an Internet connection to use Lumin, and you don’t need any special skills,” said Dawson. “If you can use a Windows computer, you’re ready to create educational materials.”

Lumin comes with exam builders, easy archiving features, basic text formatting, and the ability to add images, video, audio and music. Exported Lumin projects, called “Paks,” can be viewed on almost any mobile device or computer. The Lumin user interface can be changed for English or Spanish, with more languages expected to be available in the future.

Although Lumin can be employed in classroom settings, Dawson says that it is especially useful for non-formal, personal learning. It can also be used for homeschooling.

Download LuminLumin can be downloaded for free at www.maf.org/lumin.

In addition, MAF is hosting a contest for those who want to create a project with the new software. Just download Lumin and follow the instructions at www.maf.org/lumin/contest for a chance to win a Samsung Tablet 3.
Idaho Gives
Wednesday, April 30, 2014

NAMPA, IDAHO—Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) will be participating in the second annual Idaho Gives on Thursday, May 1st. Idaho Gives is a one-day fundraising event to celebrate and support non-profit organizations across the state. This giving day raised $575,000 for over 500 Idaho non-profits last year. Supporters of MAF gave over $5,000 on Idaho Gives day, enabling the Christian organization to bring healthcare and vaccinations to people living in isolated regions around the world.

MAF will again be seeking support from across Idaho to help raise $6,000 to deliver medical supplies and vaccines to remote areas in Africa, Indonesia, and other parts of the world.

To find out more about this unique opportunity to partner with MAF, visit www.maf.org/idahogives.

Asas de Socorro Responds to Flooding in Brazil
Friday, March 28, 2014

Asas de Socorro, the MAF affiliate organization in Brazil, is involved in disaster relief work as parts of the country experience some of the worst flooding in decades. Asas’s amphibious Cessna 206 is conducting relief flights, working in partnership with the Brazilian Civil Defense, local agencies, and churches to assist communities along the Madeira River isolated by the flooding.

Asas and SIL/JAARS have a joint facility in Porto Velho. Márcio Rempel of Asas reports water in the hangar and homes.

“The water continues rising. The Acre State is totally isolated by road,” said Márcio. “Cargo flights with Air Force C-130, CASAs and B727 are delivering food and supplies every hour in Rio Branco City. Asas is working on a project to help these people to go back home in the next two months when the river will lower again. Thousands of families will have lost everything. We are trying to develop partnerships with churches for these relief efforts.”

Photos and more information are available on the Asas de Socorro website.

How you can pray:

  • Pray for the many families whose homes have been damaged or destroyed.
  • Pray that those affected will turn to Jesus during this difficult time.
  • Pray for the safety of Asas staff doing relief flying, and that they will be able to assist many.
  • Pray that the water levels will soon subside.
MAF’s new KODIAK to visit Florida, Arizona and California before heading to Papua, Indonesia
Friday, March 21, 2014
MAF’s newest KODIAK that will serve in Indonesia
MAF's newest KODIAK is visiting Florida, Arizona, and California before heading to its final home in Papua, Indonesia. Photo by Paul O'Brien.

March 20, 2014—Mission Aviation Fellowship’s newest aircraft, a Quest KODIAK, will be visiting several areas of the U.S. before heading to its final home in Papua, Indonesia.

"This remarkable airplane will be used to deliver food, medicine, building materials, and Bibles,” said John Boyd, president and CEO of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF). “It will transport medical teams, missionaries, and relief workers. It will carry children to school and the sick to the hospital."

Before it heads to Indonesia, friends of MAF can see the KODIAK in Florida, Arizona, and California. Airplane rides will be available for $30 at the Arizona and California events: reserve your seat at http://www.maf.org/connect/events.

Florida: April 1-6, SUN ’n FUN airshow, Lakeland, Florida. Airplane dedication ceremony Saturday, April 5, at 10:30 a.m. You’ll find the MAF exhibit at the southeast exhibit area, corner of Doolittle and SUN ’n FUN roads.

Arizona: Wednesday, April 9, Wickenburg Municipal Airport, Wickenburg, AZ. Airplane rides offered 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Dedication ceremony 1:00 p.m.

California: Friday, April 11 and Saturday, April 12, Riverside Air Service at the Riverside Airport, 6741 Gemende Drive, Riverside, CA. Plane rides will be offered Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Saturday 8:00 to 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Dedication event 10:30 a.m. on Saturday.

"The KODIAK is an amazing aircraft, and is uniquely suited for MAF’s work in Papua,” said Boyd. “Hundreds of small villages lie hidden in the jungles and mountains of this rugged land. There are very few roads. A 20-minute flight in an MAF airplane saves an entire day of travel by foot.”

MAF currently has 13 airplanes in Papua, including four other KODIAKs. For many years the Cessna 206 was the workhorse of the fleet, but in recent years MAF has been replacing the 206s with KODIAKs.

Boyd explains, "Avgas is very expensive and difficult to obtain in Indonesia and many of the isolated places MAF works. In some countries we pay as much as $21 per gallon! But the KODIAK runs on jet fuel rather than avgas, and it can use most of the short, rugged airstrips served by the 206. It can fly farther and carry more cargo less expensively. It was created specifically for this kind of work."

As a non-profit, MAF relies upon many generous supporters to keep its planes in the air. The new KODIAK was purchased entirely with gifts.

"We give thanks to God for the gracious friends whose generosity allowed MAF to purchase this plane," said Boyd.

MAF Pilot Honored by Biola University
Thursday, March 06, 2014
Jonathan Blomberg and fiancée Lisa Jutsum with the Clyde Cook Missions Award.
Jonathan Blomberg and fiancée Lisa Jutsum with the Clyde Cook Missions Award.

LA MIRADA, Calif. — Mission Aviation Fellowship pilot/mechanic Jonathan Blomberg was recognized by Biola University—his alma mater—for his commitment to the Great Commission. Blomberg, who serves with MAF in Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), received the Clyde Cook Missions Award at a special ceremony on February 28.

“The Clyde Cook Missions Award, named for Biola University's former president of twenty-five years, Dr. Clyde Cook, is presented for exceptional commitment and service in the mission field,” said Don Bernstein, Biola’s alumni relations manager. “Jonathan Blomberg was chosen by university leadership and the Biola Alumni Association board to receive the 2014 award based on his commitment to bringing the Gospel to Africa through the services of MAF, and his desire to further the work of his parents in Africa.”

Jonathan has been connected with MAF since childhood. His father, Dave Blomberg, was an MAF pilot/mechanic, and still serves the organization as director of Ministry Partnership. Jonathan spent his childhood in Lesotho and the DRC, returning to the U.S. at age 12. He graduated from Biola in 2003 with a bachelor’s degree in Biblical Studies.

“It was a great honor to receive the award,” said Jonathan. “I enjoyed the opportunity to represent both MAF and Biola, and to hopefully encourage young students to serve God in missions overseas. God is good.”

In addition to his current ministry with MAF in the DRC, Jonathan served in Haiti for three weeks after the 2010 earthquake and completed IT work in Sumatra after the 2004 tsunami.

MAF Pioneer Hobey Lowrance Passes Away At Age 92
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Hobey and Olivia with two of their three sons and two Ecuadorian women, 1958.
Hobey and Olivia with two of their three sons and two Ecuadorian women, 1958.

Hobert "Hobey" Lowrance died on Friday, February 7, in Yorba Linda, California. He was 92.

Hobey was born in 1921 and became an American Airlines pilot at age 21. During WWII he flew military transports as a civilian. Hobey became a Christian through the influence of other believing pilots and felt called to Christian service.

Hobey was one of MAF's earliest staff members, joining the ministry in 1948. He flew many of the early survey flights that allowed MAF to establish flight operations in Latin America. He served with MAF in Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Honduras, Mexico, and Indonesia, as well as at ministry headquarters in California.

Gene Jordan, MAF vice president of Human Resources, says of Hobey, "He was gifted with an analytical mind, and travelled extensively around MAF's world evaluating potential flight programs and providing pilot fill-in."

Hobey was serving with MAF in Ecuador in 1949 when he met his wife, Olivia, a nurse. Hobey and Olivia retired from MAF in 1986.

Hobey was instrumental in developing MAF’s flight training and safety programs that subject pilots to the many challenging conditions they are likely to encounter while flying in unfriendly terrain and weather conditions. Many MAF pilots recall being evaluated by Hobey.

"Hobey was the flight instructor for my MAF evaluation in Ramona, California, in 1976," recalls former MAF pilot Jeff Nelson. "Marilee and I stayed for a time in the little trailer beside the Lowrances' home and Hobey shared part of his life with me as well as the flight training. I learned from Hobey the importance of a stable approach and also a healthy enjoyment of life. His account of how he would bracket a destination on a river in Brazil after flying for hours over featureless jungle came back to me when I needed it."

A memorial service is planned for March 1 at 10:30 a.m. at the Richfield Community Church, 5320 Richfield Road, Yorba Linda, California, 92886.

Please join the MAF community in praying for Hobey's family while rejoicing in his life of faithful service.

Mission Aviation Fellowship and New Tribes Mission provide desperately needed aid to remote Philippine islands
Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Organizations team up to bring food, water, and other critical supplies to those suffering following Typhoon Haiyan

The NTM/MAF team delivers rice and tarps to the island of Concepcion in the Philippines. Photo by Vaughan Woodward.
The NTM/MAF team delivers rice and tarps to the island of Concepcion in the Philippines. Photo by Vaughan Woodward.

CUYO, Philippines — Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) and New Tribes Mission (NTM) are working hand-in-hand to deliver food, clean water, and other critical aid to remote island communities of the Philippines in desperate need following Typhoon Haiyan.

NTM has four aviation personnel stationed in the Philippines on an ongoing basis, operating two small airplanes and one helicopter. So when the disaster struck they were uniquely positioned to help. MAF’s experienced disaster response personnel have travelled to the Philippines to assist the NTM crew with logistics.

The team is focusing its efforts on small, isolated islands that no one else is assisting. They have established an air bridge to transport relief supplies to the island of Cuyo. From there, the NTM helicopter delivers the aid to people in desperate need.

“We have heard that the smaller islands have had 70-80 percent destruction and no one is helping to meet this need in this remote corner of the Philippines devastated by Typhoon Haiyan,” said John W., MAF manager of disaster response and security.

The MAF/NTM team has been delivering rice, tarps, and other needed supplies. They are working with the Philippine Red Cross to distribute food and hygiene kits, and doing survey flights to identify isolated areas in need of assistance.

“We are partnering with the local church and local municipal leaders to find the best way to meet the needs and serve those most vulnerable,” said John W. “The local church in Cuyo, where the helicopter is based, is putting together family packs with rice and canned protein to sustain families in remoter islands devastated by the Typhoon.”

Those wishing to support the Philippine relief effort may give online at www.maf.org or www.ntm.org.
Pam McCurdy, spokesperson for NTM said, “We are thankful to all those who are giving so that the NTM/MAF team can continue to deliver hope and life-saving supplies to these hurting families.”


Founded in 1945, Mission Aviation Fellowship (www.maf.org) is a family of organizations with a singular mission: to share the love of Jesus through aviation and technology so that isolated people may be physically and spiritually transformed. A significant part of this global network, MAF-US is headquartered in Nampa, Idaho. Recent MAF work has combatted malaria and Ebola outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, enabled Bible translators and evangelists in Asia, Africa, and Indonesia, provided relief flights to support the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, and supported rebuilding efforts following numerous natural disasters in Haiti.

New Tribes Mission is an international church-planting mission organization. NTM works among people groups who have had little or no access to the Bible, mostly in remote locations in Africa, Latin America and the Asia-Pacific Region. While providing practical help such as medical care, community development and literacy education, missionaries share Bible lessons that allow the people to choose for themselves whether to believe on Jesus Christ and follow Him. New Tribes Mission USA is based in Sanford, Florida

Mission Aviation Fellowship Launches a Digital App for Sharing the Gospel
Monday, August 26, 2013

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has released a new digital tool that makes it easy for isolated believers to access — without the need for an internet connection.

Called Estante, which is Spanish for bookshelf, this free digital library app works  offline and allows isolated pastors and church leaders to easily store, view, and share digital Christian resources anywhere in the world. This free mobile app can be downloaded at www.maf.org/estante.

Estante, MAF-LT Mobile AppEstante gives isolated pastors a simple way to carry the Bible and Bible study tools anywhere they go,” said Jay Clark of MAF-Learning Technologies. “For many, it will be the first time they’ll have easy access to the Word of God anytime they want.”

Estante is an Android application. With Estante, users can transfer files from their Android devices to many other kinds of phones, even very basic phones that do not have Estante. It also allows users to share entire libraries with other Estante users. Estante's user interface can be customized for English, Spanish, Russian and French, and MAF expects to add more languages in the future. Its library can store files created in any language.

More than three million isolated pastors around the world have received little or no Christian training. They lack access to the most basic resources such as a Bible commentary or dictionary. However, many use cell phones. The Learning Technologies division of MAF works with ministry partners to help develop technologies and strategies to equip isolated Christian pastors and leaders with appropriate training materials. For more information visit www.maf.org/estante or contact ltproducts@maf.org, 208-498-0741.

Aviation Artist’s New Creation Celebrates the Legacy of Mission Aviation Fellowship
Monday, July 29, 2013

OSHKOSH, WI – July 29, 2013 – A new painting by well-known aviation artist Bryan Snuffer celebrates the future of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) while recognizing the aviation ministry’s historic past.

Bryan Snuffer with the MAF paintingCurrently on display in space 256 at AirVenture, The Path of Saints shows one of MAF’s new KODIAK airplanes flying over the Curaray River in Ecuador where five missionaries were martyred in 1956, including MAF pilot Nate Saint. The aircraft flown by Saint is seen in the water far below.

“Bryan has a unique God-given talent for depicting aviation,” said Gene Jordan, Vice President of Human Resources at MAF. “It’s exciting to see this first example of missionary aviation art that ties our history to our future.”

"The Path of Saints" by Bryan SnufferThe Path of Saints will be formally presented to MAF at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, July 31, during a ceremony to dedicate MAF’s newest KODIAK aircraft. This public event will be held in exhibit space 256, near Hangar B at AirVenture. All are welcome.

Snuffer hails from Muskegon, MI, and is best known as a painter of military subjects, particularly military aircraft. He has been aware of MAF’s life-saving work for many years and is pleased to honor the organization with this gift.

“The KODIAK is the future of MAF’s work in the remote places of the world,” said Snuffer, “while the Ecuador location represents the organization’s roots. This is where Nate Saint and the other gentlemen were martyred, something that many people remember. I hope The Path of Saints reminds people of the important work of MAF and all missionary aviation groups.”

Visitors to AirVenture can meet Snuffer in space 256 all day Monday and Tuesday, and through 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday. The painting will be on display for the duration of AirVenture.

The Path of Saints is acrylic on masonite and measures 24” x 36”. Visitors to the MAF exhibit can sign up for a chance to win a signed print of the painting. Following AirVenture the piece will be on display at MAF headquarters in Nampa, Idaho, and prints will be available for purchase at the MAF online store, www.mafgiftshop.org.

Snuffer’s other works can be viewed and purchased at his website, www.bryansnuffer.com or at www.the-military-store.com. He also takes commissions.

Ready to Move Mountains
Thursday, July 25, 2013

Mission Aviation Fellowship to Dedicate New KODIAK for Service in Indonesia

OSHKOSH, WI – Some four years after Mission Aviation Fellowship’s (MAF’s) first KODIAK airplane landed in Indonesia, the aviation organization is dedicating its seventh KODIAK for service in this island nation.

“Indonesia is an extremely mountainous area, and so many people and villages are left isolated by the terrain,” said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. “This new KODIAK will allow MAF to ‘move mountains’ so to speak … to bring the Gospel and the hope of a better life to these remote areas.”

MAF’s KODIAK will be on display at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh in exhibit space 256, near Hangar B. A public dedication ceremony will be held there on Wednesday, July 31, at 10:00 a.m. Please join the MAF as we commit the airplane to the service in Indonesia.

Mission Aviation Fellowship is a family of organizations with a singular mission: to share the love of Jesus through aviation and technology so that isolated people may be physically and spiritually transformed. With a fleet of 136 light aircraft, MAF serves churches, medical teams, missionaries, relief agencies and others working to make life better in the most remote corners of the world.

This is one of two KODIAKs that MAF hopes to add to its fleet in the next year. These airplanes are part of a long-term strategic initiative to upgrade the aging MAF fleet. The two floatplanes currently serving in Palangkaraya, for example—small Cessna 185s—are 51 and 44 years old.

Like many MAF airplanes, they burn aviation gasoline (avgas), which has become expensive and difficult to obtain—the ministry sometimes pays $15 per gallon or more for fuel. The KODIAK burns jet fuel, which is much less costly and more readily available than avgas. And the new KODIAKs are desperately needed.

“I recently learned of a double medical evacuation flight that MAF performed in Kalimantan, Indonesia,” said Boyd. “A truck went over the edge of a mountain road and rolled about 75 feet to the bottom of the ravine. Two badly injured men and their family members boarded the Kalimantan program’s KODIAK—the patients on blankets, strapped to the floor. A little over an hour later they were receiving life-saving treatment in the city of Tarakan.”

Boyd adds, “This would have been impossible with the Cessna 206, which isn’t able to carry that much weight or that many people for such a distance. But the KODIAK can handle it.”

MAF must now raise some $3.5 million to pay for the KODIAKs and their journeys to Indonesia. As a non-profit organization, all MAF projects are funded through gifts from committed supporters. To learn how you can help send these airplanes to Indonesia, visit www.maf.org/kodiaks.

Mission Aviation Fellowship and Aerocet Team Up To Test New KODIAK Floats
Thursday, July 18, 2013

Nampa, Idaho — Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has partnered with Aerocet, Inc. to help the manufacturer of aviation floats bring its new KODIAK floats to market.

"MAF and Aerocet have had a close relationship for many years," said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. “They have donated floats to support our ministry work and provided discounts on cargo pods. So when they asked to use our new KODIAK to test their floats, we were happy to say 'yes.'"

MAF KODIAK with Aerocet floats
The Aerocet floats have been installed on MAF’s KODIAK and are ready for testing. Photo by Tom Hamilton.

The carbon-composite floats were designed by Tom Hamilton and the engineering team at Aerocet, the world's only FAA- approved manufacturer of composite aviation floats. Hamilton is perhaps best known as the designer of the Quest KODIAK and the Glasair/Glastar/Sportsman airplanes.

"The KODIAK is an extremely versatile aircraft, and from the beginning it was designed with floats in mind," said Hamilton. "With its STOL capability and cargo capacity, it makes a great floatplane."

The aircraft rolled off the assembly line in June and was immediately outfitted with the new floats. Testing will take place in Renton, Washington, over the next few months. When the testing is complete, the airplane will be outfitted with wheels for its journey to Papua, Indonesia, where it will be put to work serving those who live and work in remote mountain villages.

The airplane with the floats will be on display at AirVenture Oshkosh July 28-August 4. It will also visit Chicago on August 6; Holland, Michigan on August 8; and the Thunder Over Michigan airshow August 10-11. Event details.

Because avgas is very expensive and difficult to obtain in the countries where MAF serves—sometimes costing more than $15 per gallon—the organization has replaced a number of its aging piston-engine planes with KODIAKs. This is MAF’s ninth KODIAK, and its seventh to be based in Indonesia. All were purchased with gifts from donors who support MAF’s life-saving work.

"One of the aircraft we are replacing in Palangkaraya, Indonesia, is a 50-year-old Cessna 185 with about 24,000 hours and the other is 44 years old with 23,000 hours," said Dave Rask, director of aviation resources at MAF. "They have been a real blessing to the people who live along the rivers there and depend on the airplane for transportation and delivery of supplies. They’re outfitted with Aerocet floats and we really like how they perform. They’re made of a composite material that is really slippery and fast in the water, because they have no rivets or seams. That means the airplane needs less water to get airborne."

Aerocet has been developing the floats for the KODIAK for the past several years. Garry Hojan, president of Aerocet, explained that they based the design on their floats for the de Havilland Beaver, with modifications. Once FAA approval is received, the floats will be available to aviators by contacting Aerocet. Aerocet's website is www.aerocet.com.

Says Hamilton, "We all have gifts. My gift is having the skills to make the tools. MAF’s gift is to be able to take the tools overseas and put them to use where they can do the most good."

MAF to Purchase Two KODIAKS for Ministry Work in Indonesia
Monday, July 08, 2013

NAMPA, Idaho — Some four years after MAF's first KODIAK airplane landed in Indonesia, the ministry is moving forward in faith to purchase two additional KODIAKS—one for service in Papua, Indonesia, and one, a floatplane, to be based at Palangkaraya, in Kalimantan.

"The Lord has provided MAF with an exciting chance to purchase two KODIAKs at substantially less than the current market price," said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. "We had not budgeted for this expense in 2013, but when such a God-given opportunity presents itself, we have to say 'YES' and 'Thank you, Lord!'"

These two KODIAKs are part of a long-term strategic initiative to upgrade the aging MAF fleet. The two floatplanes currently serving in Palangkaraya, for example—small Cessna 185s—are 51 and 44 years old. Like many MAF airplanes, they burn aviation gasoline (avgas), which has become expensive and difficult to obtain—the ministry sometimes pays $15 per gallon or more for fuel.

MAF KODIAK delivers cargo
The KODIAK can carry more cargo and passengers than a Cessna 206 while using the same remote landing sites, making it an excellent aircraft for the mountain and river areas of Indonesia. Photos by Dave Forney, MAF.
MAF KODIAK medical evacuation

The KODIAK burns jet fuel, which is much less costly and more readily available than avgas. This remarkable aircraft was designed specifically to meet the challenges of missionary aviation. It can travel longer distances than a Cessna 185 or 206 and carry more cargo while using the same challenging landing sites. And these two KODIAKs are desperately needed in Indonesia.

"Wednesday afternoon we got a call for a double medical evacuation flight from Long Nawang," said MAF pilot Dave Forney. "A truck went over the edge of the mountain road and rolled about 75 feet to the bottom of the ravine. They were fortunate to be alive."

Two badly injured men and their family members boarded the Kalimantan program's KODIAK—the patients on blankets, strapped to the floor. A little over an hour later they were receiving life-saving treatment in the city of Tarakan.

"This would have been impossible with the Cessna 206," said Forney, "because the 206 isn't capable of carrying that much weight from Long Nawang, or that many people. But the KODIAK can handle it."

Airplanes are costly. MAF must now raise some $3.5 million to pay for the KODIAKs and their journeys to Indonesia. Over the next few months MAF will be taking the KODIAK on the road so that friends of the ministry will have a chance to see this remarkable aircraft for themselves. Please be in prayer about how you might be part of this Kingdom-building project.

"Scripture says that with faith as small as a mustard seed, nothing is impossible—even mountains will move," said Boyd. "We are relying on the Lord, working through His people, to move this mountain!"

To learn how you can help send these two KODIAKs to Indonesia, visit www.maf.org/kodiak.

God Provides Christian Training Materials in Latin America
Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Flash DrivesSan Jose, Costa Rica – June 15, 2013 – So many pastors in Latin America are extremely poor. They are seldom able to buy books or learning materials, and some one million Latin American pastors have very little theological education.

Thanks to a connection that MAF's Mauricio Sanchez made with a Christian organization in Spain, the MAF-Learning Technologies team in Costa Rica recently received two 4GB flash drives containing a complete digital library with movies, audios, various Bible versions, Bible commentaries, books, and other key resources—all in the Spanish language. Copyrights are covered, meaning these exciting resources can be shared for free with pastors in the region.

Says Mauricio, "Just in the last couple of weeks we shared more than 150 copies of the library in Latin America using DVDs and USB drives." Praise God for this provision!

MAF Offers Oral Strategies Workshop in Boise
Friday, May 10, 2013

An MAF Oral Strategies WorkshopNAMPA, Idaho – The Learning Technologies department of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF), a global ministry organization based in Nampa, is offering a workshop on presenting the Gospel using storytelling. The training will be held June 4 – 8 at The Riverside Hotel in Boise, Idaho. Three-day and five-day sessions are available.

“Seventy-five percent of the Bible is in story form. This is the way Jesus, the master storyteller, chose to teach—both the uneducated and the religious leaders alike,” said Regina Manley, MAF oral communications specialist and certified Simply the Story (STS) senior instructor. “Oral Strategies skills enhance communication of Bible stories and truths across generations (from grandchildren to grandparents) and naturally encompasses a wide range of abilities (from the highly educated to including non-literate villagers). Don't miss it!”

According to Manley, over 80 percent of the world’s populations prefer learning by oral communication methods over print. This includes listening to TV, radio or movies and especially interaction with friends. Workshop participants will learn to:

  • Tell fun, accurate Bible stories
  • Lead interactive discussions
  • Teach following Jesus’ model
  • Energize their ministry – at home, church or on the mission field

Those who attend the three-day session, held evenings and Saturday, will become certified Story Practitioners. Participants in the five-day Leadership Workshop will have added opportunities to practice and develop their skills, and complete the first step to becoming an MAF certified Oral Communications Advocate.

The three-day session costs $50, and the five-day session costs $150. There is a discount for early registration by May 30 for the three-day session. The fees cover materials as well as meals and snacks during the all-day sessions.  For more information or to register, visit www.maflt.org. If you have questions, please contact Regina Manley at (208) 498-0781 or rmanley@maf.org.

Mission Aviation Fellowship is a Finalist for a 2013 Lightspeed Aviation Foundation Grant
Friday, May 03, 2013

Online Votes Will Determine Winners

NAMPA, Idaho — April 11, 2013 — Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is one of 15 nonprofit organizations named as finalists for a grant from the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation. Lightspeed made the announcement today at the SUN 'n FUN International Fly-In and Expo in Lakeland, Florida.

"We are honored to have been selected as a finalist once again," said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. "This is an exciting opportunity for MAF, and we are grateful to Lightspeed for its ongoing support of those who use aviation to do good."

The 15 finalists were chosen from hundreds nominated. Final grant recipients will be selected by aviation enthusiasts who vote online at www.lightspeedaviationfoundation.org. The charities receiving the most votes will be awarded grants ranging from $10,000 to $2,000. Winners will be announced in the fall.

With the support of many friends who voted online, MAF has received $10,000 Lightspeed grants for the past three years. To be eligible for the foundation’s grants, aviation organizations must be committed to growing the pilot community and using their grants for compassion and service to others.

Lightspeed Aviation manufactures headsets that are used by MAF pilots and others around the world.

A Former Mission Aviation Fellowship Pilot is Missing on a Ferry Flight in Africa
Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Jerry Krause of Sahel Aviation Service was flying an aircraft from South Africa to Mali when his plane went missing in the area around São Tomé, off the coast of west Africa, on April 7. 

"We were very distressed to learn that Jerry Krause and his plane are missing, and MAF personnel in Africa have been doing what they can to facilitate the search," said John Boyd, president and CEO of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF). 

Krause served with Mission Aviation Fellowship for 22 years in Mali and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He left MAF in 2009 to work with Sahel Aviation Service, a commercial aviation company in Mali. 

"Jerry and his family have many friends at MAF," said Boyd. "And many are praying on his behalf. We ask for your ongoing prayer until this situation is resolved."  

The Krause family has created a web site to post updates: http://findjerry.com.

AFRICA BOUND! MAF Dedicates Tornado-Damaged Plane For Service in the Congo
Friday, March 15, 2013

Rebuilt Cessna Grand Caravan will support mission and humanitarian work

Nampa, Idaho – Two years after it was badly damaged when a tornado touched down at an airshow, a Cessna Grand Caravan aircraft is beginning a new career as a missionary plane in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). 

In a ceremony today at its Nampa headquarters, Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) dedicated the plane for service in Africa. A crowd of MAF supporters, staff, and local guests offered prayers of dedication and thanksgiving.

“The way this aircraft ended up at MAF is just amazing,” said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. “It went from being a posh private plane with zebra-stripe interior, to a tornado casualty, to a missionary plane that will help improve life for people living in remote jungle villages.”

With its fleet of 57 light aircraft, MAF provides transportation for churches, medical teams, missionaries, relief agencies and others working in the most isolated corners of the world.

In March 2011 a tornado hit the SUN ’n FUN International Fly-in and Expo in Florida, damaging a number of aircraft including this Cessna Grand Caravan owned by a Florida family. The plane was flipped over and sustained extensive damage.

“When we first heard about the Caravan, we were interested,” said David Rask, MAF’s director of aviation resources. “We had been looking for a Caravan for our program in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and when we learned Preferred Airparts had purchased the tornado plane, we contacted them.” 

MAF purchased the plane from Preferred  Airparts in 2012. Preferred repaired the Grand Caravan with the specialized equipment that MAF needs to operate on remote, rugged airstrips in equatorial weather. And this new-again plane is greatly needed.

“There is a team waiting in the East of Congo – ready to use this tool to its full potential,” said Rick Dickson, MAF Director of Regional Operations. “It will carry life-saving medicines such as malaria treatments, or full medical response teams fighting the next Ebola outbreak. It will fly many groups who seek to bring much-needed care to villages ravaged by roaming militia or the LRA. It will carry both Congolese and expat Christ-followers who seek to build and strengthen the local church.”

The Grand Caravan right after the 2011 tornado. Photo courtesy of EAA/Brady Lane.
The Grand Caravan right after the 2011 tornado. Photo courtesy of EAA/Brady Lane.
MAF's Dave Rask and the new-again airplane. The aircraft departs for Africa in April. Photo by Colby Dees.
The Honorable Gregg L. Prickett, Chairman of the MAF Board of Directors, leads a prayer of dedication and thanksgiving for the new aircraft. Photo by Colby Dees.
- Rick Dickson of MAF, Nampa Mayor Tom Dale, and Missionary Kid Reagan Bryant check out the cockpit of the Caravan. Reagan, age five, is the daughter of Luke and Joy Bryant who will be serving with MAF in Indonesia.
Rick Dickson of MAF, Nampa Mayor Tom Dale, and Missionary Kid Reagan Bryant check out the cockpit of the Caravan. Reagan, age five, is the daughter of Luke and Joy Bryant who will be serving with MAF in Indonesia.
MAF Dedicates Plane for Service in Mexico
Thursday, February 21, 2013

Nampa, Idaho – February 20, 2013 – A Cessna 182 aircraft will soon be providing life-saving services to people living in remote areas of Mexico, thanks to a family that discovered Mission Aviation Fellowship on the internet.

At a dedication ceremony held Wednesday, February 20 at the ministry’s headquarters in Nampa, Idaho, MAF staff prayed that the plane will be an effective tool for sharing the Gospel and changing lives. They also gave thanks to God for the way it came to MAF.

According to Dave Rask, MAF director of Aviation Resources, a Texas family owned the small plane but seldom flew it. They believe in sacrificial giving and thought the aircraft would be more useful on the mission field. Not knowing about MAF, they Goggled missions and aviation and MAF popped up at the top of the list. They then contacted Rask and made the decision to donate their plane.

Since arriving at MAF, the C182 has received special modifications that will allow it to operate in rugged areas of Mexico where it will serve with Alas de Socorro, the MAF affiliate organization working there.

MAF is grateful to the thousands of faithful friends who support the ministry through their prayers and gifts.

Update from Bunia, East DRC
Friday, January 18, 2013

The latest update from the Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) team working in the northeastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) shows an area still beset with uncertainty as well as sporadic violence in the outlying areas. MAF program manager Jon Cadd reports that most NGOs that evacuated in November have now returned. 

In eastern DRC, MAF operates three aircraft supporting the work of the church, missionaries, medical organizations, Bible translators, relief workers, and other NGOs. Four MAF pilot/mechanic families are currently serving in Bunia along with some 20 Congolese staff members, and four families are working from Kampala, Uganda. MAF also has staff and planes in the western and southern regions of the DRC. 

Please continue to pray for the Congolese people, the MAF team in eastern DRC, and all staff who work in such difficult areas.

Bunia Reports Things Relatively "Normal"
Thursday, November 29, 2012

Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo—MAF pilots in Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, report that things feel relatively "normal" in this eastern DRC town, despite insecurity in other parts of the region.

Bunia is located some 325 miles north of Goma, the city of one million inhabitants that was taken over by the M23 rebel group last week.

Though many NGOs have evacuated their staff in the region, the three MAF pilots in Bunia are conducting their usual flights for church, mission, and humanitarian organizations. Some of those flights included delivery of medicines and medical personnel, transport of a Bible translator and a medical patient, and conveyance of church workers to an area where they are conducting outreach activities.

Amid riots last week, MAF relocated its families (including children) to Kampala, Uganda, on Tuesday, November 20, leaving three pilots in Bunia to provide flights for those in need.

Last weekend, the people of Bunia celebrated the 100-year anniversary of the CECA 20/Africa Inland Mission church in the DRC. Thousands gathered at the city stadium for a lively time of worship and celebration. Many from outside of Bunia were in town to attend.

Please continue to pray for peace and healing for this volatile region.

MAF Remains on Standby to Evacuate Relief and Mission Workers from Eastern DRC
Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo—As violence once again shakes the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mission Aviation Fellow (MAF) pilots and planes are on standby to evacuate relief and mission workers who request assistance.

On Wednesday, Nov. 21, MAF families were evacuated from the town of Bunia, where MAF has a base, to Kampala in Uganda. MAF also carried two plane loads of staff from other agencies to safety in Uganda. Three MAF pilots remain in DRC with three aircraft.

This latest round of violence began earlier this week when the M23 rebel group attacked the eastern DRC town of Goma. It has since spread to other towns in the region.

MAF has ministered in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for more than 50 years. The organization currently has nine planes serving from bases in Kinshasa, Bunia, and Lubumbashi.

DRC Malaria and Ebola Outbreaks Slowing
Wednesday, November 07, 2012
MAF delivers medical supplies to combat a malaria epidemic
MAF delivers medical supplies to combat a malaria epidemic. Photo by Jon Cadd.

Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo — MAF staff working in the northeastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo report a slowing of the malaria epidemic that has killed scores of people this year.

At its worst, during June, Nebobongo Christian Hospital logged five malaria-related deaths per day in its pediatric wards. Last month, the medical director reported that deaths had decreased to two or three per week with aggressive medical intervention.

Likewise, an Ebola outbreak discovered in the Isiro area in August appears to be slowing. An October 26 report from the World Health Organization (WHO) noted 52 cases of Ebola to date (35 laboratory confirmed, 17 probable) with 25 fatalities.

MAF has provided flight support to the WHO, Doctors Without Borders, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other medical organizations in their efforts to contain the illnesses. MAF has transported medicines, medical supplies, doctors and other personnel to remote areas where the viruses have been so deadly.

How you can pray:

  • Pray that experts might yet be able to identify what has caused this year’s increased malaria rates and why it has become so deadly.
  • Pray for flight safety for the MAF pilots as they deliver critically needed medicines.
  • Pray that the red-and-white MAF planes will be a tangible reminder of God’s love.
  • Pray for comfort for hundreds of families who have lost children and other loved ones.
MAF Offers Oral Learning Workshop in Meridian, Idaho, October 23-27, 2012
Monday, October 08, 2012

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF), a global ministry organization based in Nampa, is offering a workshop on presenting the Gospel using story telling. The training will be held October 23 - 27 at Central Valley Baptist Church in Meridian, Idaho. Three-day and five-day sessions are available.

“Seventy-five percent of the Bible is in story form. This is the way Jesus, the master storyteller, chose to teach—both the uneducated and the religious leaders alike,” said Regina Manley, MAF oral communications specialist and certified Simply the Story (STS) senior instructor. “Stories reach the heart! Workshop participants will learn how to use Bible stories to naturally engage their listeners in experiencing God’s Word for themselves.”

According to Manley, some 80 percent of the world’s population either do not read, or prefer to learn without written methods of communication. Even here in the USA, a strong preference for oral communication is expressed by the saying, “When all else fails, read the instructions!”  The workshop presents ways to effectively connect with these oral learners. 

 “The workshop is very useful for anyone who wants to find new ways to teach and share God’s Word, be that on the mission field or with media-savvy teenagers in the U.S.” said Manley. “Some have found this brings family devotions alive. Others use STS to plant churches and train leaders, while others have become STS trainers themselves, multiplying their effectiveness.” 

Workshop participants will learn to …

•  Lead interactive, inductive Bible studies

•  Tell fascinating, accurate Bible stories without using written materials

•  Teach using interactive discussion

•  Design questions that help listeners discover spiritual truths and personal applications 

Those who attend the three-day session, held evenings and Saturday, will become certified STS Practitioners. Participants in the five-day “Leadership Workshop” will have additional opportunities to practice and develop their skills, and will obtain STS Provisional Instructor certification. 

Manley has extensive knowledge and experience in the field of oral learning. She has presented oral strategies workshops in Brazil, Venezuela, India, Colombia, Lesotho, Sierra Leone, Thailand, Guatemala, Mexico, Costa Rica, and northern Africa. Manley also served 17 years as an MAF missionary in Ecuador. 

The three-day session costs $50, and the five-day session costs $130. There is a discount for early registration. The fees cover materials as well as meals and snacks during the all-day sessions. The workshop will be held at Central Valley Baptist Church, 600 N Ten Mile Road in Meridian, Idaho. For more information or to register, visit www.maflt.org. If you have questions, please contact Regina Manley at 208-498-0781 or rmanley@maf.org.

MAF Assessing Relief Needs After Tropical Storm Isaac Hits Haiti
Saturday, August 25, 2012

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – MAF staff in Haiti are on standby to assist with relief efforts after Tropical Storm Isaac struck the island nation Friday and Saturday. 

David Carwell, MAF Haiti program manager, reports that all MAF staff are safe and aircraft undamaged. One of MAF’s planes, a Cessna Caravan, was flown to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, prior to the storm as it could not fit in the hangar. 

Carwell says the Port-au-Prince airport is officially open, though the terminal is empty of any employees or passengers. Power is out at the airport; many streets are flooded and trees are down in some places. Most businesses are closed, though Carwell noted some small grocery stores were open.

From Jacmel, south of Port-au-Prince, MAF’s Jason Krul reports greater damage, including landslides that have blocked the road between Jacmel and Haiti’s capital. 

As more information becomes available MAF will assess needs to determine what response is necessary.

Photos

Haiti, Tropical Storm Isaac - roads

Haiti, Tropical Storm Isaac - roads

Haiti, Tropical Storm Isaac did not damage any airplanes

Haiti, Tropical Storm Isaac did not damage any airplanes

Haiti, Tropical Storm Isaac took out the MAF (old logo) hangar sign

MAF Unveils New Global Logo
Wednesday, August 15, 2012
Logo, Clear BG 72dpi



Old MAF International Logo
Top: MAF’s new global logo, which updates its historic dove emblem. It will replace the two emblems below.
Center: The logo used by MAF-US since 1992.
Bottom: The wings-and-Bible design used by MAF in Europe and some other areas.

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) today unveiled a new logo that gives a fresh look to the aviation ministry’s historic dove emblem.

“From the wings-and-Bible emblem used in some parts of the world, to the dove used by MAF in the United States, the MAF logo has long been a symbol of hope and help to isolated people in remote corners of the globe,” said John Boyd, president and CEO of MAF-US. “This new logo continues that proud tradition.”

Mission Aviation Fellowship is a global family of organizations that uses aviation, communications, and learning technologies to share the gospel and bring vital help to people isolated by poor roads and infrastructure, geographic barriers, natural disasters, or insecurity. This summer MAF has been actively involved in combatting malaria in northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, supporting relief work in South Sudan, and enabling the work of churches, evangelists, and Bible translators across Africa and Asia.

Utilizing blue, red, and gray, the new logo’s bold, clean lines reflect the organization’s reputation for professionalism and competency. The dove – part of MAF-US’s logos since the 1970s – was maintained in the new design and represents the Christian faith, aviation, and MAF history.

MAF serves in 32 countries of Africa, Asia, Eurasia, and Latin America, and several different logos are currently used. This new insignia will be adopted in all areas and be easily recognized.

MAF will begin using the new logo immediately. However, it may be some time before all 142 planes in the fleet are repainted with the new emblem.

MAF Uses New DRC Airstrip to Combat Malaria
Wednesday, June 13, 2012

BUNIA, Democratic Republic of the Congo – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is using a new airstrip to bring desperately needed medical supplies to remote parts of Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) plagued by malaria.

Delivering Medical Supplies“We made our first landing at the new Zobia airstrip on June 9, and on Tuesday we conducted four more flights delivering 1,300 kg of supplies,” said Jon Cadd, MAF’s chief pilot in eastern DRC. “The Cessna 206 was loaded with bulky meds and other medical equipment. We had the smaller medicine boxes stuffed into every available nook and cranny.”

Mission Aviation Fellowship is a Christian ministry organization that uses aviation and other technologies to support some 1,500 church, medical, and relief organization working in isolated areas. With a fleet of 142 bush planes, MAF reaches the most difficult regions of 32 countries.

According to Cadd, the villages in northern DRC have been severely affected by malaria this year. The medical clinic in Zobia is underequipped and unable to effectively treat all those who are ill. In nearby Nebobongo, the small hospital was treating 88 malaria-infected children in a ward with 22 beds. MAF staff in Uganda obtained medical supplies and flew them to DRC, where they were then flown out to the small villages in need

The new airstrip at Zobia was carved out of the jungle by villagers using hand tools to remove trees, brush, and grass. Saturday’s flight was the first to the area in some 20 years.

Delivering Medical Supplies“We had been told that many people were dying for lack of malaria treatment, and the whole community was out for the great celebration when the little plane landed,” said Cadd. “People from the village had been working tirelessly to get the strip rehabilitated so the aircraft could bring the meds and medical teams that would help them. The paths through the forest are not big enough to accommodate a car, and until the airstrip opened everything had to come in by motorcycle or by foot.”

Malaria is the leading cause of death in DRC. According to Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières, MSF), there has been a 250 percent increase in malaria cases in the country since 2009, with a marked increase in cases in 2012. A period of relative malnutrition and lack of mosquito netting have contributed to the increase. In DRC, 180,000 children under age five die from malaria each year.

MAF has been serving the people of DRC for more than 50 years from its bases in Bunia, Kinshasa, and Lubumbashi.

MAF Dedicates Missionary Plane for Service in Haiti
Monday, April 30, 2012
Mission Aviation Fellowship Haiti Caravan Plane Dedication ceremony
Several hundred people gathered in Nampa on Saturday to dedicate MAF’s newest plane, which will serve in Haiti. MAF is a global mission organization which uses aviation and technology to improve the conditions of isolated people around the world. Photo by Colby Dees.

NAMPA, Idaho — Amidst a crowd of several hundred supporters, staff, and local residents, Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) dedicated a Cessna Caravan aircraft in an April 28 ceremony at the ministry's headquarters in Nampa, Idaho.

MAF is a faith-based, nonprofit ministry that serves missions and isolated people around the world with aviation, communications and learning technologies.

Funded by gifts from supporters, the new plane will depart in May for Haiti, where it will support the work of churches, medical teams, and relief workers laboring to rebuild the island nation still suffering two years after the devastating earthquake. MAF has served in Haiti for 25 years and has a permanent base at the Port-au-Prince airport.

Mission Aviation Fellowship Haiti Caravan Plane Dedication ceremony
Talia Wills (top left), Larinda Fuller, Macy Fuller, and Gabriella Fuller explore the new MAF plane destined for Haiti. They are the children of MAF missionaries preparing for service in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A plane dedication event was held on Saturday. Photo by Colby Dees.

"The airplane is the tool that God has given MAF to reach out to a lost and hurting world," said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. "And two years after the horrendous earthquake Haiti is still hurting, both physically and spiritually."

Dr. David Alexander, president of Northwest Nazarene University, led the prayer of dedication. David Rask, director of aviation resources at MAF, spoke about the plane and the impact it will make.

"One of the principal tasks of this plane will be to carry work teams – people who come from the U.S. for one or two weeks to build schools, orphanages, and medical clinics, to provide clean drinking water, or to build churches," said Rask. "In times of great needs, such as earthquakes and floods, this plane will carry food, water, and shelter."

The dedication ceremony was part of a day of activities that included airplane rides, a pancake feed, a gift drawing, videos, and children’s activities. Staff from MAF's Learning Technologies division demonstrated the latest gadgets for sharing the gospel easily and discretely in difficult areas of the world.

Nampa Woman Marks 81st Birthday with Ride on Missionary Plane
Saturday, April 28, 2012
Mission Aviation Fellowship Haiti Caravan Plane Dedication ceremonyBetty Burge, and other passengers receive pre-flight instructions from Jeff Turcotte. Photo by Colby Dees.

NAMPA, Idaho — When Betty Burge marked her 81st birthday on Saturday, April 28, she celebrated by taking a ride on a small MAF missionary plane as part of her commitment to "do something outside of the box at least once a month."

In December, the spry Ms. Burge had her picture taken with Santa Claus for the first time in her life. In March, she convinced a girlfriend to go with her to a biker church at the Busted Shovel Bar and Grill in Meridian, Idaho.

"Life has become more restrictive for me recently as I have a lot more difficulty hearing," Burge said. "So, I wanted to spice things up a bit by getting creative and trying lots of new things."

She tries different ethnic restaurants and even attended a Romanian funeral that lasted four hours! "I wouldn’t recommend that," Burge said.

Mission Aviation Fellowship Haiti Caravan Plane Dedication ceremony
Betty Burge seated aboard the MAF KODIAK ready for takeoff. Photo by Colby Dees.

This month her out-of-the-box experience was a ride in one of MAF's missionary airplanes. On Saturday, April 28 -- Ms. Burge's birthday – the Nampa-based ministry organization dedicated a new aircraft for service in Haiti, and offered airplane rides as part of the day's activities. Betty Burge just couldn't resist.

Ms. Burge is a long-time supporter of MAF, and even sponsors one of its missionaries – Brendan Blowers, a Nampa-native who serves with MAF in Costa Rica.

While she hasn't flown in a smaller aircraft in a while, it won't be her first time. When Ms. Burge lived in Moses Lake, WA, she dated a man with a pilot's license.

"He used to call me up and invite me to dinner in Seattle," Ms. Burge said. "Of course, I didn't turn that down!"

Update from MAF Banda Aceh Program Following Earthquake
Wednesday, April 11, 2012

MAF personnel in Banda Aceh, on the Indonesia island of Sumatra, are evaluating the situation to determine how to best respond following an 8.7 magnitude earthquake that struck off the coast of Sumatra Wednesday.

An MAF pilot/mechanic in Banda Aceh reports that all MAF personnel are safe. She said that the ground shook for 4.5 minutes. Phone service is unreliable and “roads are crazy” as people attempt to reach high ground. At this time there does not appear to be major damage in the area. A tsunami warning issued earlier has now been lifted.

MAF has three international families and five Indonesian staff members in Banda Aceh.

MAF Named Finalist for a 2012 Lightspeed Aviation Foundation Grant
Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Villagers greet the MAF plane in a remote area of Kalimantan, Indonesia. Photo by Dave Forney, MAF.
Villagers greet the MAF plane in a remote area of Kalimantan, Indonesia. Photo by Dave Forney, MAF.

NAMPA, Idaho  –– Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is one of 20 nonprofit organizations named as finalists for a 2012 grant from the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation. Lightspeed made the announcement today at the Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-In and Expo in Lakeland, Florida.

The final grant recipients will be selected by aviation enthusiasts who vote online at the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation website. The five charities that receive the most votes will each receive a grant of $10,000.

“We are grateful to the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation for its support of those organizations that use aviation to do good,” said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. “This is an exciting opportunity for MAF, and we encourage our friends to vote online!”

Voting is open March 28 through Nov. 2, 2012. Winners will be announced in November.

MAF received Lightspeed grants in 2010 and 2011, with Lightspeed citing the ministry organization’s work to meet the physical and spiritual needs of isolated people around the world. To be eligible for the foundation’s grants, aviation organizations must be committed to growing the pilot community, building awareness, and using their grants for compassion and service to others.

Lightspeed Aviation manufactures headsets that are used by MAF pilots and others around the world.

Join MAF at the Sun 'n Fun Airshow in Lakeland, Florida!
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
MAF is in the Fly4Life Tent at Sun 'n Fun
MAF is located in the Fly4Life Tent

LAKELAND, Florida – March 27, 2012 – Aviation enthusiasts are invited to visit Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) at the Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-in and Airshow, happening now through Sunday, April1, in Lakeland, Florida.

Billed as “Spring Break for Pilots,” the 2012 Sun ‘n Fun event is expected to attract 160,000 to 170,000 visitors from Central Florida, North America and more than 80 other countries. The event is the largest aviation convention in the state of Florida and the first major international aviation event of the year in the Americas.

MAF, a global ministry organization that uses aviation and technology to share the Gospel, will have an exhibit inside the “Fly4Life” tent in the southeast exhibition area, space #8. The MAF exhibit includes murals illustrating the organization’s history, a flight simulator, and videos showing MAF planes taking off and landing at challenging airstrips in remote, isolates areas of the world. MAF will also hold a drawing for a gift basket featuring safari-type gifts valued at id="mce_marker"55.

MAF pilot and recruiter John Hook will present a forum on The Art of Short Field Take-Offs and Landings on Wednesday March 28at 11:00 a.m. in room #7 of the Central Florida Areospace Academy. Hook has been with MAF since 1975, flying in Indonesia and Haiti before joining the U.S. recruiting team.

Sun ‘n Fun is held at the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport. Learn more at

www.sun-n-fun.org.

MAF Plane Dedication
Friday, March 16, 2012

Mission Aviation Fellowship Dedicates Two Planes for Service in Indonesia

NAMPA, Idaho -- Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF), an aviation, communications, and technology ministry serving 1,500 Christian and relief organizations worldwide, today dedicated two new aircraft for service in remote areas of Indonesia.

The Kodiak planes were given as gifts by two donors who wish to remain anonymous. Each Kodiak costs some $1.7 million dollars.

"I know the excitement the sound of these planes will generate in places with names like Kiwi, Bomela, Langda, and Koropun," said Dave Rask, MAF’s director of Aviation Resources. "These are places that have never seen a car. Places so remote that the only way to reach them is a long trek through the jungle, or by plane. In these areas, the missionaries, the medicines, books, Bibles … even the nails for the buildings and the aluminum for the roofs are delivered by MAF."

Mission Aviation Fellowship Kodiak Plane Dedication ceremony
Mission Aviation Fellowship President John Boyd addresses guests at the dedication of two planes for service in Indonesia. Photo by Colby Dees.

Some 150 people gathered at the MAF aircraft hangar in Nampa, Idaho, to ask the Lord to bless the work of the two planes and the people they will serve.

MAF has been ministering in the isolated areas of Indonesia since the 1950s. Today, MAF has 48 missionary staff members and 102 Indonesian employees serving in Indonesia with 22 planes. In 2011, MAF flew 14,735 Indonesian flights, delivering 51,918 passengers and 4,870,818 pounds of cargo.

"The needs in Indonesia are so great that MAF's capacity has never been able to meet all the demands," said Rask. "The Kodiak  is a larger, faster plane that is able to land on most of the small airstrips we use. One pilot can double his output and goods can be delivered for much less. Will these planes change lives?  Absolutely!"

Over the next two years, MAF hopes to acquire seven more aircraft to replace aging planes and meet growing demands for service. All seven are earmarked for Africa.

Mission Aviation Fellowship Celebrates 25 Years of Service in Haiti
Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Beyond natural disasters, MAF is committed to the people of Haiti who live in remote and isolated areas

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti––With more than 100 missionaries, aviation officials, and other guests on hand, Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) celebrated 25 years of service in Haiti with a special ceremony Tuesday afternoon at the MAF aircraft hangar at the Port-au-Prince Airport.

Mission Aviation Fellowship personnel prepare to load an injured Haitian man aboard one of the ministry organization's planes. MAF is celebrating 25 years of service in Haiti. Photo by Anthony Cece.
Mission Aviation Fellowship personnel prepare to load an injured Haitian man aboard one of the ministry organization's planes. MAF is celebrating 25 years of service in Haiti. Photo by Anthony Cece.

MAF is a Christian ministry organization that uses airplanes and other technologies to serve church and relief organizations in remote areas of the world.

MAF officials shared about the work in Haiti, as did guest speaker Joe Hurston, an independent missionary pilot who lobbied MAF to come to Haiti in the mid-1980s.

"This morning I had the opportunity to visit Pignon and see some of the impact MAF is making in Haiti through the ministry partners we serve," MAF President and CEO John Boyd said at the event. "I am as excited as I've ever been about what is happening here in Haiti and look forward to what God is going to do through MAF in the next 25 years."

MAF began operating in Haiti in 1986, serving missions and relief agencies in remote areas of the country. Poor infrastructure has plagued Haiti's development and causes non-profit organizations serving there to seek alternative transportation. A trip that might take eight hours or longer over rough, unsafe roads can be reduced to 25 minutes aboard an MAF plane.

Greg and Barb Van Schoyck, missionaries serving in Pignon with the Haitian American Friendship Foundation, noted how MAF has enabled them to minister more effectively.

"Flying MAF gives us the opportunity to be good stewards of the resources God has provided us. Trucks are expensive and the roads take their toll," Greg said. "Long drives over terrible roads batter not only our trucks but our bodies as well. It didn't take long to determine that flying is more cost effective for us in the long run."

Following the massive earthquake that hit Haiti in January 2010, MAF's knowledge of the country and expertise in transportation, communication, and disaster response positioned the organization to effectively serve the scores of humanitarian and medical aid groups that descended upon Port-au-Prince. It is that longevity within Haiti that has endeared MAF to local church leaders, medical groups and government officials.

Over the past two years, MAF has played a critical role in efforts to halt the spread of cholera in Haiti. MAF has assisted Samaritan's Purse, Operation Blessing, Medical Teams International, and other groups by transporting medical teams, equipment, and supplies.

Anniversary celebrations will continue Wednesday, Feb. 29, with a reception and worship service at Quisqueya Chapel in Petionville, Haiti.

Growing Pains in South Sudan
Friday, February 03, 2012

Due to refugee movement, tribal conflicts, and the activities of development organizations in South Sudan, there has been an increased demand for MAF services. MAF-Kenya, based in Nairobi, is ramping up its operations in Juba, South Sudan to meet the need. Recent flights in the area have resulted in 400 blind people receiving sight—thanks to doctors from Christian Blind Mission—and a 10-day mobile clinic bringing dental care to nearby Chad.

MAF Work Vital to Rebuilding Efforts in Haiti
Thursday, January 05, 2012

Two Years after Quake, Ministry Organization Enables the Work of some 30 Relief Agencies

MAF Haiti personnel load a plane with food, including
MAF Haiti personnel load a plane with food, including “Manna Packs,” specially formulated food packets for people on starvation diets. Photo by John W.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – Two years after a devastating earthquake crippled Haiti and killed thousands, Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) remains actively involved in the rebuilding process, supporting more than 30 relief organizations with critical flights to 15 airstrips.

“We have been encouraged by the progress made in Haiti over the past year, but we know there is still a long road ahead,” said John Boyd, MAF president and CEO. “It is a privilege to serve the people of Haiti daily and we look forward to continuing our role in assisting with rebuilding efforts.”

MAF, which currently operates three planes in Haiti and has been serving the country since 1986, provides daily flights for relief workers, medical personnel, churches, and work teams involved in community development efforts. In a country where roads are nearly impassable and bandits threaten travelers, MAF services are invaluable.

The ministry organization has also distributed micro grants to help families and small businesses get back on their feet after the earthquake. MAF funding has allowed families to rebuild their homes and send their children to school. MAF also assisted in repairing a school, provided meals for school children, and constructed 26 small homes for those in need.

Since cholera broke out in late 2010, nearly 500,000 cases have been reported, resulting in more than 265,000 hospitalizations and some 6,800 deaths. The Haitian Ministry of Health recently reported that it expects the cholera epidemic to continue for the next two to three years as it spreads from urban centers to rural areas. MAF has aided in the ongoing battle against cholera by flying medical teams and supplies to clinics and hospitals.

While the country has suffered through some dark times, many people seem encouraged about Haiti’s future.

“The country is optimistic right now about what is going on,” MAF Haiti program manager David Carwell said. “We’ve also seen many churches and mission organizations that have been strengthened and are moving forward. We pray that MAF can be a catalyst in the process.”

MAF Adds New Training Technology
Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Donor Gifts Enable Purchase of Flight Simulator for Relief Organization

NAMPA, Idaho—October 26, 2011—Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has acquired a new high-tech flight simulator, providing another tool to help prepare its pilots for the challenging conditions they face when flying in remote parts of the world.


MAF employees Jason Chatraw (left) and Scott Channon try out the new RedBird flight simulator. Purchased with donations, the Redbird will allow MAF to provide a more realistic training experience for its missionary pilots. Photo by Colby Dees.

With funds raised by the MAF Ministry Advocates—a volunteer group—supplemented by a matching grant, MAF purchased the RedBird SD flight training device for approximately $60,000.

This new piece of equipment is a fully-enclosed Advanced Aviation Training Device that is certified by the FAA. With visuals that wrap around the device and realistic flight controls, pilots have an opportunity to experience a simulated flight with conditions similar to the environments in which they will fly.

"This new RedBird enables us to do a lot of training that we couldn't do before," said Paul Bergen, MAF's aviation training manager. "We can experience the overseas environment—we can see the exact terrain. We can fly in the mountains and over rivers and give pilots an experience similar to what they're going to see when they arrive on the field."

By training at Idaho's backcountry airstrips, MAF is able to duplicate the mountainous terrain of various countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Matching the atmospheric conditions of those places isn't so easy. With the new flight simulator, an instructor can introduce weather and other variables such as causing a plane to malfunction with low oil or instrument failures, or simulate engine failure. Bergen says it will be especially useful for training pilots to fly in instrument-only situations, where visibility is limited.

"It gives us a much more realistic experience than we had before," Bergen said.

MAF Receives Second Grant from the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation
Friday, September 23, 2011

NAMPA, ID — Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is one of five aviation charities to receive a $10,000 grant from the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation. Lightspeed announced the winners today at the AOPA Aviation Summit in Hartford, Connecticut.

Jeff Turcotte and Scott Channon received the gift on behalf of Mission Aviation Fellowship
Jeff Turcotte and Scott Channon received the gift on behalf of MAF

This is the second year that MAF has received a Lightspeed grant. The recipients were selected by pilots from around the world who cast their votes on the foundation’s website.

"We are so grateful for the flight community’s vote of confidence in MAF," said John Boyd, president and CEO. "We appreciate the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation and its commitment to doing good through aviation."

Lightspeed cited MAF’s work to meet the physical and spiritual needs of those in isolated areas of the world, as well as the ministry’s partnership and service to Christian organizations and other agencies.

The foundation was established in 2010 by Lightspeed Aviation Corporation to promote the pilot community and serve others for the betterment of the world. The company manufactures aviation headsets. More information is available at www.lightspeedaviationfoundation.org.

MAF Helping Fight Cholera and Measles Epidemics in Democratic Republic of the Congo
Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Aviation Ministry Flying in Doctors, Critical Vaccines, Medical Supplies

KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo – As cholera and measles sicken thousands in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is providing desperately needed flight services to assist medical agencies in their efforts to combat these deadly diseases.

MAF delivers a load of medical supplies and beds to a measles clinic in Democratic Republic of Congo. Photo by Tim Chase.
Mission Aviation Fellowship delivers a load of medical supplies and beds to a measles clinic in Democratic Republic of the Congo. Photo by Tim Chase.

A measles epidemic has threatened the DRC for the past nine months. MAF, a faith-based relief organization that brings aid to needy people in remote areas of the world, has been flying medical workers and supplies into the areas most affected.

In the past month MAF has carried some 100 medical staff and 14,000 pounds of vaccines and medical supplies to support 24 mobile clinics that Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières, MSF) has launched to fight measles.

“We have recently flown 13 flights to Malemba from Lubumbashi for MSF France, transporting doctors, nurses, logistics people, vaccines, medical supplies, generators, beds, food, water – you name it,” said MAF Pilot Tim Chase. “We have also been flying for MSF Holland, as they assess the situation and prepare to respond. Our support of this crisis is ongoing.”

Says Chase, “In one village, the residents wanted help so desperately that 300 people worked four days to clear and reopen an overgrown airstrip so MAF could land with the medical team and supplies.”

According to UN reports, some 115,600 Congolese children suffered from measles between January and June, and 1,145 died of the disease. MAF has provided continuing support for treatment and vaccination campaigns.

While measles plagues south central DRC, cholera threatens the western part of the country. Ron Wismer, MAF program manager in western DRC, reports the aviation ministry has been transporting medicines and personnel from Kinshasa into Bolobo and Mbandaka, towns located north of Kinshasa on the Congo River.

“We are now flying into Mbandaka two or three times per week to support the cholera work, and also flying regularly into Bolobo,” said Wismer. “The epidemic seems to be following the river.”

Cholera was first reported in western DRC in March. According to the World Health Organization, 3,896 cases have been reported, including 265 deaths.

MAF Offers Oral Learning Workshop in Boise August 16 - 20
Monday, August 01, 2011

NAMPA, Idaho – Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF), a global ministry organization based in Nampa, is offering a workshop on presenting the Gospel using story telling. The training will be held August 16 - 20 at MAF’s facility in Nampa.  Three-day and five-day sessions are available.

“Jesus told stories. Seventy-five percent of the Bible is in story form,” said Regina Manley, MAF Oral Communications Specialist and certified Simply the Story (STS) senior instructor.  “Stories reach the heart! Workshop participants will learn how to use Bible stories to engage their listeners and present the Gospel more effectively.”

According to Manley, some 80 percent of the world’s population either do not read, or prefer not to learn using written methods of communication. The workshop presents ways to effectively connect with these oral learners.

Those who attend the three-day session, held evenings & Saturday, will become certified STS Practitioners. Participants in the five-day “Leadership Workshop” will have additional opportunities to practice and develop their skills, and will obtain STS Provisional Instructor certification.

“The workshop is very useful for anyone who wants to find new ways to share God’s Word, be that on the mission field or with media-savvy teenagers in the U.S.” said Manley. “Some have found this brings family devotions alive. Others use STS to plant churches and train leaders, while others have become STS trainers themselves, multiplying their effectiveness.”

Workshop participants will learn to …

  • Lead interactive, inductive Bible studies
  • Tell fascinating, accurate Bible stories without using written materials
  • Teach using interactive discussion
  • Design questions that help listeners discover spiritual truths and personal applications.

Manley has extensive knowledge and experience in the field of oral learning. She has presented oral strategies workshops in Brazil, India, Colombia, Lesotho, Thailand, Guatemala, and northern Africa. Manley also served 17 years as an MAF missionary in Ecuador.

The three-day session costs $30, and the five-day session costs $80.  The fees cover materials as well as meals and snacks during the all-day sessions. For more information or to register, visit www.maflt.org.  If you have questions, please contact Regina Manley at 208-498-0781 or rmanley@maf.org.

MAF Preparing for Famine Relief Flights
Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Nairobi, Kenya—06-21-11—An airplane from the Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) program in South Africa is flying to Kenya to reinforce the mission organization’s response to the famine in the Horn of Africa.

Over the past week, MAF has flown leaders from relief and mission organizations, as well as ambassadors from several countries, into the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya to assess the situation.

The organization is also experiencing increasing demand for flights into South Sudan following the country’s independence earlier this month.

“MAF is in contact with a number of relief organizations working in the area,” said John W., MAF manager of disaster response and security.  “We are ramping-up our capacity to respond should the need for relief flights continue to grow.”

With this additional plane, MAF will have seven aircraft in Kenya.  To maximize flight capacity, MAF crews have been working into the night so that planes are ready to depart early each morning.

On Wednesday, the UN declared a famine in parts of southern Somalia.  Across the region, 11 million people are facing a hunger crisis caused by several years of severe drought.

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