Aviation

Aviation

We operate a fleet of 51 light aircraft from 17 bases in seven countries in Africa, Asia, Eurasia, and Latin America. Our pilots save valuable travel time and cover seemingly impossible distances in minutes or hours compared to days by foot, road, or river. Each year, we fly over two million nautical miles to speed the work of some 600 Christian and humanitarian organizations. MAF flights support indigenous churches and local evangelists, create access to medical care, provide disaster relief, and make community development projects possible ... in some of the most remote places on earth.

MAF Planes

  • Cessna 206

    Single-Engine (Piston) with seating for 6.

    21 Cessna 206s are in service with MAF-US.

    This faithful workhorse has been the mainstay of the MAF fleet for many years. With its sizable cabin and double cargo doors it is well suited to transport both passengers and cargo to the most remote destinations. Many of our 206s are turbocharged allowing them to operate at higher altitudes

    Adopt a Cessna 206 serving in Lesotho or Mozambique.

  • Cessna 208

    Single-Engine (Turboprop) with seating for 10.

    11 Cessna 208s are in service with MAF-US.

    The "big brother" in the Cessna family. The Caravan can haul more, further, and faster. It is equipped with a cavernous cargo pack underneath to haul a large load. This bigger plane does require longer, more improved, airstrips however.

    Adopt a Cessna 208 serving in East DRC or West DRC.

  • Quest KODIAK 100

    Single-Engine (Turboprop) with seating for 10.

    11 KODIAKs are in service with MAF-US.

    This airplane was designed from the ground up to thrive in the "bush." A special high-lift wing and a 750 horsepower engine allow this capable machine to operate on shorter airstrips while hauling heavier loads. It has replaced the Cessna 206 in some regions because it burns jet fuel instead of expensive avgas.

    Adopt a KODIAK serving in Papua.

  • Cessna 182

    Single-Engine (SMA Diesel) with seating for 5.

    1 Cessna 182 is in service with MAF-US.

    This Cessna's slightly smaller size makes it ideally suited for missions that require less capacity. It flies the same speed as a 206 and can land on the same airstrips but burns less fuel. This one is unique in that it has a diesel engine that burns jet fuel.

  • Cessna 207

    Single-Engine (Piston) with seating for 8.

    2 Cessna 207s are in service with MAF-US.

    This is the Cessna 206's twin brother with an extra row of seats. It fills a niche where more passenger seats are needed.

    Adopt a Cessna 207 serving in Haiti.

  • Pilatus PC-12

    The Pilatus PC-12 is a single-engine turboprop passenger and cargo aircraft.

    It allows MAF to carry more cargo further and faster than many of the other airplanes in MAF’s fleet—making it an ideal tool for a vast country like the DRC.

  • Beechcraft King Air 200

    Twin-Turboprop with seating for 13.

    2 King Airs are in service with MAF-US.

    This pressurized, twin-engine, turbo-prop machine is the largest airplane in the MAF fleet. It is well-suited for missions that require long range and the capability to fly through or over bad weather.

  • Cessna 210

    Single-Engine (Turbocharged) with seating for 6.

    1 Cessna 210 is in service with MAF-US.

    This is the fastest, most sophisticated, member of our piston-engine fleet. The retractable landing gear and laminar-flow wing allow it to fill the needs of long-range missions.

  • Cessna 185

    Single-Engine with seating for 6.

    2 Cessna 185s are in service with MAF-US

    These venerable airplanes have been active in the MAF fleet the longest. Equipped with floats, these airplanes can land on most rivers and lakes opening access to the remotest parts of the world.

  • Cessna 172

    Single-Engine (Piston) with seating for 4.

    2 Cessna 172s are in service with MAF-US.

    Its mild-mannered, forgiving temperament makes it an ideal airplane for training new pilots. This little brother of our Cessna fleet is quite happy going round and round the airport traffic pattern patiently enduring bounce after bone-jarring bounce. Many MAF pilots learned the "ropes" at the controls of a Cessna 172.